PARI Lightning Detector

Lightning Detector


Lightning Strike Display and History for last 24 hours

Summary

Current lightning activity measured from the PARI Campus

The lightning detector shows strikes within 200 miles of PARI.

The detector uses two Very Low Frequency receivers at different frequencies to form a bearing and range indication which the computer plots on screen.

This data is for informational purposes only and is not to be used for protection of life or property.

This is a depiction of the current lightning activity in the region. Larger symbols represent more recent strokes. The count in the upper left corner is the number of strokes detected in the last minute.

For the newest strokes, cloud-to-ground is shown as a small yellow lightning bolt, and intercloud/intracloud is shown as red triangles.

For older strokes, green and cyan denote cloud-to-ground discharges, and blue and pink denote intercloud/intracloud discharges.

Solar Astronomy – Radio JOVE Antenna

Radio JOVE Antenna – Solar Radio Astronomy

Powerful radio emissions from the Sun and Jupiter are receivable with simple equipment in the 17 to 30 MHz range.

To study the powerful radio emission variations as a function of frequency, R. Flagg, (retired from the University of Florida), and Jim Sky (Radio Sky radio astronomy products http://radiosky.com ) have designed a simple radio receiver and software ( SkyPipe ).  Dr. Jim Thieman at the NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center manages project JOVE which uses the hardware and software at more than 500 schools around the world.

In this frequency range shortwave broadcast stations, automobile ignition noise and summer lightning storms all add to the noise. By monitoring our remote data feed through SkyPipe, the students are able to determine whether they are receiving local interference or Jupiter/Solar signals. SkyPipe is available as a free downloadable file on the RadioSky website. The software allows three levels of participation: single user, client and server. Single user records audio from the receiver and stores it. Client allows a student to connect to PARI and other worldwide servers to monitor without having any receiver or antenna. Server mode allows data to be streamed live to the Internet so other clients can receive it.

Solar energy bursts will be measured during the day using this antenna and various receivers. A solar flare sounds similar to a Jovian LBurst with an ocean wave crashing on the shore sound lasting typically about 90 seconds. Click the picture below to listen to an audio recording of a solar flare.

SkyPipe software allows students at schools around the world to compare PARI's live data with their own. The JOVE project is one of the easiest and most inexpensive radio astronomy projects in which a student can become involved. The antenna can be as simple as a wire dipole and still provide good results.


RadioSky homepages for information on SkyPipe software and Jupiter observing.
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center project JOVE

Rates & Fees – Research

Visiting PARI – Rates & Fees

Current rates and fees include:

General Admission

$10 per person (purchase 3 admission tickets and receive one admission free)
$8 for seniors and students (elementary through college)
Free admission for military, first responders, and children 5 and under.

Programs

2 hour AdventureDome/educational program on site

$110 Flat fee for less than 10 people
$11/person for more than 10 people
Contact Christi Whitworth for more information

AdventureDome Programs – Offsite

varies by county (see chart)
Contact Christi Whitworth for more information

Smiley Radio Telescope$100/user (includes 4 hours of time on the instrument)
Contact Christi Whitworth for more information
Special Guided Tours 2 hours Monday – Friday $150 flat fee for less than 10 people
Birthday Party $150 flat fee for 10 or fewer people, $15 per person after minimum
Contact Christi Whitworth for more information

 

AdventureDome Fees by County

North Carolina Counties Number of Programs
County 3 – 4 5 or More
Transylvania $300 $400
Buncombe, Haywood, Henderson $325 $425
Jackson, Macon, Polk $350 $450
Clay, Graham, Swain, Madison $375 $475
Avery, Burke Caldwell, Cherokee, Cleveland, Mitchell $425 $525
Rutherford, McDowell, Yancey $400 $500
South Carolina Counties Number of Programs
County 3 – 4 5 or More
Pickens $325 $425
Rabun, Greenville, Oconee $350 $450
Towns, Habersham, Stephens, Anderson, Spartanburg $375 $475
Laurens, Cherokee $425 $525
York $450 $550

 

Rest Areas and Meals

Overnight Rest Area (Bed, sheets and towels) $60.00/day
Contact Ann Daves for more information
Breakfast (Continental) $8.00/day
Contact Ann Daves for more information
Lunch (Sandwich, chips and drink) $12.00/day
Contact Ann Daves for more information
Dinner (Hot meal) $15.00/day
Contact Ann Daves for more information
Refreshments (Drinks and snacks) $5.00/day
Contact Ann Daves for more information
Package Rate $95.00/day
Contact Ann Daves for more information

Services

Administrative Support Contact Ann Daves for more information
Astronomer Consultant Contact Ben Goldsmith for more information
Educational Instructor Contact Christi Whitworth for more information
Multimedia Room (includes network connections)** Contact Ann Daves for more information
PARI Nature Center (includes observing w/ telescopes)** Contact Ben Goldsmith for more information
Classroom Fee (other than Multimedia Room)* Contact Ann Daves for more information
Technical Services : Electronics, Engineering, Facilities Contact Ben Goldsmith for more information
Use of bucket truck with operator (1 hour minimum) Contact Don Curto for more information
Network Connection Contact Lamar Owen for more information
Telephone Contact Ann Daves for more information

 * includes network connection
** can be included in program fee

Telescopes

26-meter radio telescope (on site use) Contact Ben Goldsmith for more information
Two 26-meter radio telescopes (interferometer) (on site use) Contact Ben Goldsmith for more information
12m radio telescopeContact Ben Goldsmith for more information
4.6m radio telescope (remote use; $100 minimum) Contact Ben Goldsmith for more information
South Observatory: 0.3m optical telescope (onsite or remote) Contact Ben Goldsmith for more information
North Observatory 0.35m optical telescope (on site or remote) Contact Ben Goldsmith for more information
West Observatory 0.4m optical telescope (onsite or remote) Contact Ben Goldsmith for more information

Site Use Contact John Holloway for more information

Weather Stations

Weather Stations

Three weather stations on the PARI campus provide data to scientists. They are regularly used by scientists working remotely, who need to know current conditions at PARI before beginning observation sessions.

 

Case Western Red Survey

Case Western Red Survey

These are 197 objective prism plates taken of the northern sky. A 4 degree prism was placed on the front of the telescope resulting in images of stellar spectra. The collection was taken between June 1978 and January 1980. This particular collection is meant for scientists who want to study the spectra of stars. Each jpeg image is about 1.5MB. Full raw images (~75 MB) may be requested.

 

Canada-France-Hawaii Observatory

Canada-France-Hawaii Observatory

The Canada-France-Hawaii (CFH) observatory hosts a world-class, 3.6 meter optical/infrared telescope. The observatory became operational in 1979 and is located atop the 4200 meter summit of Mauna Kea, HI.  The images shown below are of NGC 3109; both images are from a section of the same wide-field prime focus exposed on a 10″ x 10″ glass plate. The first is the original negative image and the second is a positive colorized image.

NGC 3109 is 4.2 Million light years away and is classified as a Magellanic type irregular galaxy.  NGC 3109 is oriented edge-on from our point of view and the disk appears to be composed of stars of all ages, whereas the halo contains only very old metal-poor stars. NGC 3109 does not appear to possess a galactic nucleus.

CFH Plate #A-1773 – NGC 3109 – 28 January 1982

CFH-A1773 3.6meter 2400ppi.jpg

CFHT NGC3105 19820128.jpg

Nova Cygni 1920

Nova Cygni 1920

Nova Cygni 1920 – August 1920 – University of Michigan’s 37.5″ reflector. The following (uncalibrated) spectral images show five days in the life of this novae: August 23, 24 25, 29 and September 2, 1920. Spectral images record the violent changes in a nova from day-to-day and hour-to-hour.  Examination of the spectral lines help astrophysicists determine the complex processes that happen as a star becomes a nova. These spectral images are part of a collection of 20,000+ glass plates from the University of Michigan spanning the period from 1911 to 1973. Each of the 472 individual stars contain a number of plates ranging from 5 to 150 and span a time period from only a few days up to several decades.

07-Nova Cygni 1920.jpg